Scientists Create Mammalian Cells With Single Chromosome Set

ScienceDaily (Sep. 7, 2011)

Researchers have created mammalian cells containing a single set of chromosomes for the first time in research funded by the Wellcome Trust and EMBO. The technique should allow scientists to better establish the relationships between genes and their function.

Mammal cells usually contain two sets of chromosomes — one set inherited from the mother, one from the father. The genetic information contained in these chromosome sets helps determine how our bodies develop. Changes in this genetic code can lead to or increase the risk of developing disease.

A single Chromosome

To understand how our genes function, scientists manipulate the genes in animal models — such as the fruit fly, zebrafish and mice — and observe the effects of these changes. However, as each cell contains two copies of each chromosome, determining the link between a genetic change and its physical effect – – or ‘phenotype’ — is immensely complex.

Now, in research published in the journal Nature, Drs Anton Wutz and Martin Leeb from the Wellcome Trust Centre for Stem Cell Research at the University of Cambridge report a technique which enables them to create stem cells containing just a single set of chromosomes from an unfertilised mouse egg cell. The stem cells can be used to identify mutations in genes that affect the cells’ behaviour in culture. In an additional step, the cells can potentially be implanted into the mouse for studying the change in organs and tissues.

The technique has previously been used in zebrafish, but this is the first time it has been successfully used to generate such mammalian stem cells.

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Categories: Biology, Genetics

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