Ahmadiyya Population in World (2016)

Source: Ahmadiyya Media Library

According to the World Christian Encyclopedia, the Ahmadiyya movement is the fastest growing sect within Islam as of the early 21st century. The country with the largest Ahmadiyya population is Pakistan, with an estimated 4 million Ahmadi Muslims. Excluding small nations, the country with the largest proportion of Ahmadi Muslims to other Muslims is Ghana, standing at 16%. The country with the highest percentage is Sierra Leone standing at over 8%.

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Source: Wikipedia

Ahmadiyya is an Islamic religious movement founded in India near the end of the 19th century by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, who claimed to have fulfilled the prophecies of the world’s reformer during the end times, who was to herald the Eschaton as predicted in the traditions of various world religions and bring about the final triumph of Islam according to Islamic prophecy.

As of 2016 the community has been established in 209 countries and territories of the world.[1][2][3][n 1] with concentrations in South AsiaWest AfricaEast Africa and Indonesia. The community is a minority Muslim sect in almost every country of the world. On the other hand, it has spread to most countries of the world.[4][5] In some countries, it is practically illegal to be an Ahmadi Muslim. For instance, in Pakistan, following the Ordinance XX, Ahmadis cannot call themselves Muslims, profess the Islamic creed publicly or call their places of worship mosques. Together, these factors make it difficult to estimate the Ahmadiyya population for both the community itself and as well as independent organizations. For this reason, the community gives a figure of “tens of millions”;[6] however, most independent sources variously estimate the population to be at least 10 to 20 million[7] worldwide, thereby representing around 1% of the world’s Muslim population.[n 2]

According to the World Christian Encyclopedia, the Ahmadiyya movement is the fastest growing sect within Islam as of the early 21st century.[n 3] The country with the largest Ahmadiyya population is Pakistan, with an estimated 4 million Ahmadi Muslims. Excluding small nations, the country with the largest proportion of Ahmadi Muslims to other Muslims is Ghana, standing at 16%. The country with the highest percentage is Sierra Leone standing at over 8%.

The population is almost entirely contained in the single, organized and united movement, commonly referred to as the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community (AMC), headed by the Khalifa. The other is the Lahore Ahmadiyya Movement, which represents less than 0.2% of the total Ahmadiyya population.[n 4]

Countries[edit]

Maps[edit]

The following maps summarize the data presented in the table below.

World Ahmadi Muslim population. (Sources are various. See table below.)
World Ahmadi Muslims as a percentage of Muslims. (Sources are various. See table below.)

Table[edit]

The following figures display estimates of the number of Ahmadi Muslims and their percentages by country. However, it does not list all the countries with the Ahmadiyya presence. In particular, it does not list a number of countries which have a large presence of Ahmadis. This includes BeninBurkina FasoIvory CoastGuineaThe Gambia and a number of Arab States.

Baitul Islam mosque, Greater Toronto Area, Canada.

Ahmadiyya Central mosque, Tamale, Ghana.

Mahmood mosque, Haifa, Israel, overlooking the Mediterranean Sea.

Al Mahdi Mosque, Old Harbour, Jamaica.

Baitul Nasr Mosque, Oslo, Norway.

Country/Region Ahmadiyya population Percentage (%) of Muslims Percentage (%) of
population
Notes/
Sources
 Algeria (details) 1,000 < 0.1 < 0.1 Estimate[8][9]
 Argentina (details) 15,500 2.0 < 0.1 Estimate[10]
 Australia (details) 3,000 0.8 < 0.1 Estimate[11]
 Austria (details) 300 0.1 < 0.1 Estimate[12]
 Bangladesh (details) 100,000 0.1 0.1 Estimate[13][n 5]
 Belarus (details) 30 0.2 < 0.1 Estimate[14]
 Belgium (details) 1,250 0.2 < 0.1 Estimate[15]
 Belize (details) 50 1.8 < 0.1 Estimate[16]
 Brazil (details) 20 0.1 < 0.1 Estimate[17]
 Bulgaria (details) 400 < 0.1 < 0.1 Estimate[18]
 Cameroon (details) 430,000 12.0 2.2 PRC[19]
 Canada (details) 25,000 2.5 0.1 Estimate[20]
 Chad (details) 220,000 4.0 2.0 PRC[19]
Democratic Republic of the Congo Congo (details) 540,000 6.0 0.7 PRC[19]
 Denmark (details) 600 0.3 < 0.1 Estimate[21]
 Egypt (details) 50,000 0.1 < 0.1 Estimate[22]
 Fiji (details) 2,000 3.6 0.3 1996 Census[n 6]
 France (details) 1,000 < 0.1 < 0.1 Estimate[23]
 Germany (details) 35,000-45,000 0.9 < 0.1 Estimate[24][25][26]
 Ghana (details) 635,000 16.0 2.5 PRC[19][n 7]
 Guatemala (details) 100 8.3 < 0.1 Estimate[27]
 Guinea Bissau (details) 13,000 2.0 0.8 PRC[19]
 Guyana (details) 200* 0.4 < 0.1 Estimate[n 8]
 India (details) 1,000,000 0.6 < 0.1 Estimate[28][29]
 Indonesia (details) 400,000 0.2 0.2 ARDA[30][31]
 Ireland (details) 500 1.2 < 0.1 Estimate[32]
 Israel (details) 2,200 0.2 < 0.1 Estimate[33]
 Italy (details) 100 < 0.1 < 0.1 Estimate[34]
 Jamaica (details) 100 2.0 < 0.1 Estimate[35]
 Japan (details) 300 0.3 < 0.1 Estimate[36]
 Kazakhstan (details) 500 < 0.1 < 0.1 Estimate[37]
 Kenya (details) 198,000 4.0 0.3 PRC[19]
 Kyrgyzstan (details) 1,000 < 0.1 < 0.1 Estimate[38]
 Lesotho (details) 350 35.0 < 0.1 AMC[39]:76
 Liberia (details) 85,000 10.0 1.2 PRC[19]
 Malaysia (details) 2,000 < 0.1 < 0.1 Estimate[40]
 Mali (details) 260,000 2.0 1.6 PRC[19]
 Marshall Islands (details) 10 100.0 < 0.1 Estimate[41]
 Mauritius (details) 4,000 1.9 0.3 Estimate[42]
 Mexico (details) 100 2.7 < 0.1 Esitimate[43]
 Morocco (details) 500 < 0.1 < 0.1 Esitimate[44]
 Netherlands (details) 1,500 0.2 < 0.1 Estimate[45]
 New Zealand (details) 400 1.0 < 0.1 Estimate[46]
 Niger (details) 970,000 6.0 5.5 PRC[19]
 Nigeria (details) 2,840,000 3.0 1.3 PRC[19]
 Norway (details) 1,500 1.0 < 0.1 Estimate[47]
 Pakistan (details) 600,000 – 4,900,000 0.3 – 2.2 0.3 – 2.2 Various estimates[n 9]
 Poland (details) 38 0.2 < 0.1 Estimate[48]
 Russia (details) 50 < 0.1 < 0.1 Estimate[37]
 Senegal (details) 116,000 1.0 0.9 PRC[19]
 Sierra Leone (details) 500,000 12.0 8.1 AMC
 Singapore (details) 200 < 0.1 < 0.1 1970s Estimate[49]
 Solomon Islands (details) 1,000 50.0 0.2 Estimate[n 10]
 Spain (details) 500 < 0.1 < 0.1 Estimate[50]
 Suriname (details) 14,000 18.9 2.6 2012 Census[n 11]
 Swaziland (details) 250 12.5 < 0.1 AMC[39]:107
 Sweden (details) 800 0.2 < 0.1 Estimate.[n 12]
  Switzerland (details) 800 0.2 < 0.1 Estimate[51]
 Tanzania (details) 2,540,000 15.0 4.5 PRC[19]
 Thailand (details) 300 < 0.1 < 0.1 AMC Estimate[52]
Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago (details) 500* 0.7 < 0.1 Estimate[n 13]
 Tuvalu (details) 50 100.0 0.5 2005 Estimate[53]
 Uganda (details) 192,000 4.0 0.5 PRC[19]
 United Kingdom (details) 30,000 1.0 < 0.1 Estimate[54]
 United States (details) 15,000 0.6 < 0.1 Estimate[55]
 Zambia (details) 500 0.8 < 0.1 Estimate[56]

See also[edit]

Islam:

Other religions:

References[edit]

Notes

  1. Jump up^ Depending on the definition, there are 195 or 196 countries in the world, of which 193 are member states of the United Nations. Under the constitutive theory of statehoodthere are 206 sovereign states. There are dozens of territories and colonies that are sometimes erroneously called “countries”. See:
  2. Jump up^ A figure of 10 to 20 million represents 0.62% to 1.25% of the worlds Muslim population.
  3. Jump up^ The Ahmadiyya Movement has been the fastest growing sect according to the World Christian Encyclopedia for a number of decades. For this, see earlier editions. The 2001 edition places the growth rate at 3.25%, which is the highest of all Islamic sects and schools of thought. See:
    • David B. Barrett; George Thomas Kurian; Todd M. Johnson, eds. (February 15, 2001). World Christian Encyclopedia. Oxford University Press USA. ISBN 0195079639.
  4. Jump up^ The Lahore Ahmadiyya Movement has unofficially stated its total population to be up to 30,000, of which 5,000 to 10,000 live in Pakistan. On this basis, the Lahore Ahmadiyya Movement represents approximately 0.2% of the total Ahmadiyya population.See:
  5. Jump up^ There is also an upper estimate of 200,000 Ahmadi Muslims in Bangladesh.
  6. Jump up^ The actual figure as stated in the 1996 census is 1,976.
  7. Jump up^ Ghana’s Muslims have previously raised concern over the census figures which states that 17% of Ghanaians belong to the Muslim faith. It is claimed that Muslims represent somewhere between 30 and 45% of Ghana. Under this, the Ahmadiyya population would number almost 2 million. The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community itself gives an estimate of over 2 million Ahmadis in Ghana. See:
  8. Jump up^ There are over 200 members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in Guyana. However, the Lahore Ahmadiyya movement is also active in Guyana, for which figures are unavailable at the moment. Thus, a figure of 200 is unlikely to be representative of the total Ahmadiyya population. See:
  9. Jump up^ The 1998 Pakistani census states that there are 291,000 (0.22%) Ahmadis in Pakistan. However, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community has boycotted the census since 1974 which renders official Pakistani figures to be inaccurate. Independent groups have estimated the Pakistani Ahmadiyya population to be somewhere between 2 million and 5 million Ahmadis. However, the 4 million figure is the most quoted figure. See:
  10. Jump up^ It is estimated that there are 1,000 Ahmadis in the country. However, Sunni Muslims claim to have more followers in the country. Taking a lower bound, it can be stipulated that Ahmadis represent 50% of the country’s Muslims. See
    • “Muslims in Melanesia: putting security issues in perspective”. Australian Journal of International Affairs. Taylor & Francis. 62 (3): 408–429. September 2008.
  11. Jump up^ The exact figure as stated in the 2012 census is 14,161
  12. Jump up^ Estimates range from 500 to 1,100. See:
  13. Jump up^ There are over 500 members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community. However, there is also a large presence of the Lahore Ahmadiyya movement, for which figures are unavailable. Thus, a figure of 500 is unlikely to be representative of the total Ahmadiyya population. See:

Citations

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  23. Jump up^ Jørgen Nielsen; Samim Akgönül; Ahmet Alibašić; Egdunas Racius. Yearbook of Muslims in Europe6. p. 229.
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  31. Jump up^ Bruce Vaughn. Indonesia: Domestic Politics, Strategic Dynamics, and American Interests. Diane Publishing Co. p. 20. Retrieved February 22, 2014.
  32. Jump up^ Lorna Siggins (September 20, 2014). “Persecuted Muslims build first Irish mosque in Galway”. Irish Times. Retrieved September 20, 2014.
  33. Jump up^ Estimate:
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  37. Jump up to:a b Anna Tsurkan. “Альтернативный ислам на постсоветском пространстве: особенности распространения ахмадиййата.” (in Russian). Keston Institute. Retrieved October 1, 2016.
  38. Jump up^ “Kyrgyz Officials Reject Muslim Sect”. RFE/RL. January 6, 2012. Archived from the original on January 6, 2012. Retrieved February 24, 2014.
  39. Jump up to:a b Ahmadiyya Muslim Mosques Around The World – A Pictorical Presentation. Ahmadiyya Muslim Community; Khilafat Centenary Edition. 2008. ISBN 978-1882494514.
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  45. Jump up^ “Poort krijgt nieuwe moskee”. December 13, 2013. Retrieved April 26, 2014.
  46. Jump up^ “Prayers for Opening”. stuff.co.nz. October 31, 2013. Retrieved March 4, 2014.
  47. Jump up^ “Omstridt moské åpnes på Furuset”. aftenbladet.no. September 29, 2011. Retrieved March 4, 2014.
  48. Jump up^ The role of borderlands in united Europe: historical, ethnic and geopolitical problems of borderlands. p. 142.
  49. Jump up^ James L. Peacock. Muslim Puritans: Reformist Psychology in Southeast Asian Islam. p. 147. Retrieved February 25, 2014.
  50. Jump up^ Gerardo Elorriaga (June 24, 2014). “El Islam del amor” (in Spanish). Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  51. Jump up^ Matthias Kortmann; Kerstin Rosenow-Williams. Islamic Organizations in Europe and the USA: A Multidisciplinary Perspective. p. 102. Retrieved February 23, 2014.
  52. Jump up^ “Monthly Sinar Islam”. Vol. 2 (5 ed.). May 2015.
  53. Jump up^ Gary D. Bouma; Rodney Ling; Douglas Pratt (2010). Religious Diversity in Southeast Asia and the Pacific. p. 198.
  54. Jump up^ “Ahmadiyya Muslim Community celebrates 100 years since first missionary came to UK”. This is Local London. June 3, 2013. Retrieved May 2, 2014.
  55. Jump up^ “Muslim group to get own caucus on Capitol Hill”. Washington Times. February 27, 2014. Retrieved March 1, 2014.
  56. Jump up^ Some basics of religious education in Zambia. Retrieved March 30, 2014.

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