Burqa Bans Rise In Sub-Sahara Over Fear Of Suicide Bombers Hiding Behind Veils… Pakistan women boxers make history

Burqa Bans Rise In Sub-Sahara Over Fear Of Suicide Bombers Hiding Behind Veils

February 14, 2016

Increasingly, questions are being raised about burqas and security concerns in sub-Saharan Africa, where Boko Haram, the radical Islamist militant group operating out of Northern Nigeria, has conducted numerous terrorist operations.

In some cases burqas have been used by suicide bombers to infiltrate crowded places.

A burqa by definition conceals identity and allows ample room for wearers to conceal bomb vests. When a male suicide bomber wearing a burqa murdered 15 people in Chad’s capital, N’Djamena, last summer it came amid increasing scrutiny in the region over the security threat posed by allowing full face and body veils.

In June, Chad’s government banned the burqa amid a raft of fatal suicide bombings, saying the garb was being used as “camouflage” by militants. Amid a growing regional threat posed by Boko Haram, the Islamic State group-aligned, Nigeria-based radical Islamist group that threatened four West African countries, local governments have adopted (a) burqa-ban stance.

In July, Cameroon followed Chad’s example, banning the garb in five of its 10 provinces, while Niger implemented the ban in its restive Diffa province. The Republic of Congo also prohibited the burqa last year. In Nigeria, President Muhammadu Buhari is mulling a similar policy. Senegal is, too.

Security measures have been implemented in the region in recent months to combat a rising tide of suicide bombings, including curfews, increased scrutiny of vehicles with tinted windows, and even a ban on motorbikes (a preferred bomb-delivery device) in crowded areas.

Most people in Chad, Senegal and Niger are Muslim while one in five Cameroonians practice Islam. But historically, adherents in the region have been adverse to extreme Islamic expressions, including the full face veil and the baggy, black burqa, which are considered by many in the region to be a practice foreign to local traditions. Muslim women in the region have historically leaned toward colorful, face-exposing head scarves.

But in the past few decades, owing largely to Saudi Arabia’s efforts to spread its super-strict brand of Islam, the full black body veil has taken root in sub-Saharan Africa.

“We thought it would never be part of the culture in Senegal, but more and more people are following these rituals,” Aliou Ly, a Senegal-born assistant professor at Middle Tennessee State University, told The Economist in a report published Saturday.

afkinsider.com/119447/burqa-bans-rise-in-sub-sahara-over-fear-of-suicide-bombers-hiding-behind-veils/#sthash.uJFG7QUn.dpuf

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Pakistan women boxers make history – Bano’s hopes of winning a medal cut short 

15/02/2016

Gloves are on as Pakistan women boxers make history at South Asian Games

(MENAFN – Arab Times) Three Pakistani women are making history this weekend as they step into the boxing ring at the South Asian Games in India, the first time the conservative Muslim nation has fielded women boxers internationally.

Khoushleem Bano, Rukhsana Parveen and Sofia Javed say to achieve their dream of competing they had to battle conservative groups in Pakistan who believe women should not participate in the sport.

“It was not an easy path for us when we shared our idea of women taking up the macho sport in a conservative country like Pakistan. There were a lot of anti-groups who didn’t accept us,” 23-year-old Bano said in the northeast Indian city of Shillong.

Bano’s hopes of winning a medal were cut short on Saturday night when she lost her first fight to Nepal’s Minu Gurung in the fly-weight (51 kg) category.

“It was a good experience for me. I will come back stronger next time,” Bano told AFP.

Javed will take to the ring for the first timegainst India’s Pooja Rani in the 75 kg category, while Parveen will glove up against Sri Lanka’s M. Vidushika Prabadhi in the evening.

The trio only took up boxing in early 2015 and have been trained by their coach Nauman Karim – a bronze medallist at the 2003 World Boxing Championship – for the South Asian Games.

They credit India’s Mary Kom, a five-time world champion who is also competing at the 12th South Asian Games, including a biographical film of the Olympic bronze medallist as inspiring them to take up the sport.

“My only dream was to represent Pakistan. I only want to make my country proud in the field of the sport. I have achieved the first step despite all odds,” Bano said. Parveen was formerly a member of the Pakistan World Cup team for Indian wresting-style sport kabaddi, with the team winning bronze in 2014.

The 60 kg category boxer from Multan in Punjab province said she took up the challenge after learning that Pakistan “had no woman boxers”.

menafn.com/1094591023/Pakistan-women-boxers-make-history—Banos-hopes-of-winning-a-medal-cut-short

Gloves are on as Pakistan women boxers make history at South Asian Games

  • SHILLONG, INDIA // Three Pakistani women are making history this weekend as they step into the boxing ring at the South Asian Games in India, the first time the conservative Muslim nation has fielded women boxers internationally.

Khoushleem Bano, Rukhsana Parveen and Sofia Javed say to achieve their dream of competing they had to battle conservative groups in Pakistan who believe women should not participate in the sport.

“It was not an easy path for us when we shared our idea of women taking up the macho sport in a conservative country like Pakistan. There were a lot of anti-groups who didn’t accept us,” Bano said in the northeast Indian city of Shillong.

Bano’s hopes of winning a medal were cut short on Saturday night when she lost her first fight to Nepal’s Minu Gurung in the fly-weight (51kg) category.

“It was a good experience for me. I will come back stronger next time,” Bano told Agence France-Presse.

Javed will take to the ring for the first time later Sunday against India’s Pooja Rani in the 75kg category, while Parveen will glove up against Sri Lanka’s M Vidushika Prabadhi in the evening.

The trio only took up boxing in early 2015 and have been trained by their coach Nauman Karim, a bronze medallist at the 2003 World Boxing Championship, for the South Asian Games.

They credit India’s Mary Kom, a five-time world champion who is also competing at the 12th South Asian Games, including a biographical film of the Olympic bronze medallist as inspiring them to take up the sport.

“My only dream was to represent Pakistan. I only want to make my country proud in the field of the sport. I have achieved the first step despite all odds,” Bano, 23, said.

Parveen was formerly a member of the Pakistan World Cup team for Indian wresting-style sport kabaddi, with the team winning bronze in 2014.

The 60kg category boxer from Multan in Punjab province said she took up the challenge after learning that Pakistan “had no woman boxers”.

Categories: Africa, Burka, The Muslim Times

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