Don’t count ‘doomsday asteroid’ out yet

Editor’s note: Greg Bear is an internationally bestselling science-fiction author of many books, including “Moving Mars,” “Darwin’s Radio” and “Hull Zero Three.” As a freelance journalist, he covered 10 years of the Voyager missions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

(CNN) — Look up at our nearest neighbor, the moon, and you’ll see stark evidence of the dangerous neighborhood we live in. The Man in the Moon was sculpted by large-scale events, including many meteor and asteroid impacts.

In 1994, the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 dove into Jupiter. The result was awesome. The impact caused a brilliant flash, visible in Earth telescopes, and left an ugly dark scar on Jupiter’s cold, gaseous surface.

Greg Bear

Greg Bear

With the recent fly-by of a 1,000-foot-wide asteroid labeled 99942 Apophis, one of a class of space rocks referred to as “near-Earth objects” or “Earth-grazers,” scientists have revised their worst estimates of its chances of striking Earth. Current thinking is: We’re safe. For the next couple of decades.

But this does not mean the danger is over. Far from it.

Named after the evil Egyptian serpent god Apophis, lord of chaos and darkness — and recently dubbed the “doomsday asteroid” — it flies past Earth every seven years. This year, its 1,000-foot bulk approached to within 9 million miles. In 2029, it will swoop in close enough to put some of our orbiting satellites in peril — 20,000 miles. In that year, no doubt Apophis will arouse even more attention, because it will be visible in the daytime sky. In 2036, it will probably pass by at a reassuring 14 million miles.

Yet there’s always a possibility we don’t have these measurements exactly right. Something could happen at any point in Apophis’ orbit to modify its course, just a smidgen. A tiny collision with another object, way out beyond Mars? What could change between now and 2029, or during any orbit thereafter?

Apophis masses at more than 20 million tons. If it hit Earth, the impact would unleash a blast the equivalent of over a billion tons of TNT. That’s not an extinction event, but it could easily cause billions of deaths and months, if not years, of climate disruption.

Read further in CNN

1 reply

  1. Scary. Most of us are ignorant of the fact that so many dangers are lurking on us on land and in the skies.
    At least its knowledge will make us remember God and pray to God to be saved from any such disaster.

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