Women unite for World Hijab Day, which is Today

World hijab day

Nazma Khan founded the World Hijab Day in 2013 [Photo courtesy WHD Organization]. The Muslim Times has the best collection of articles about Hijab and modest dressing and the Muslim women rights

Women unite for World Hijab Day

Source: Al Jazeera

By Saba Aziz

Growing up in the Bronx in New York City with a hijab covering her head, Nazma Khan says she is all too familiar with religious discrimination from a young age.

The Bangladesh native migrated to the United States at the age of 11 and was constantly bullied throughout middle and high school.

The bullying took on another level after the deadly coordinated attacks of September 11, 2001.

“Every day, I would face different challenges just walking on the street,” she told Al Jazeera. “I was chased, spit on, surrounded by men, called a terrorist, Osama bin Laden, etc.”

To connect with others who were facing similar challenges because of their head covering, Khan invited Muslim women to share their experiences of discrimination on social media.

“As I read through the stories, I saw my own struggles in my sisters,” the 35-year-old said.

That is when Khan decided to launch the World Hijab Day (WHD).

Each year on February 1, Khan’s non-profit organisation invites females of all faiths, backgrounds and ethnicities to wear the hijab for a day in solidarity with Muslim women worldwide.

The hijab is a headscarf worn by Muslim women who feel it is part of their religion.

“By walking in my shoes for one day on February 1, women would see that I am no different from them,” the president and founder of the World Hijab Day Organisation explained.

“Perhaps, this one day experience will make them see the hijab in a different light. Since its inception in 2013, more than 70 global ambassadors from over 45 countries have been involved and women from around 190 countries participate in the annual event.

Read further

10 replies

  1. Living in the west, the hijab has become a potent indicator of identity with many non-Muslims viewing it as a political statement. However, it is pertinent to note that the hijab is, first and foremost, an act of worship that women engage in, and an act undertaken to seek the pleasure of one’s Lord.

    The definition of a hijab is fiercely contested by many Muslims, and unfortunately most of those who engage in the topic are unaware that it is very much defined by Islamic law, the Sharia, and not cultural habits or one’s idea of what modesty is, or should be.

    In discussing the hijab, Islamic jurists have stipulated a number of conditions for it to be a hijab in the Islamic sense. In brief, these conditions are that one’s clothing must cover the entire body in a way that the shape of the body is not apparent and the material must not be so thin that one can see through it. Clothing should not resemble that which is specific to men nor the disbelievers. It should not be attractive to men, nor should women be perfumed in public. The main aim of hijab is to stop fitnah; females who are attractive by nature attract the gaze of males which then leads to other greater sins such as fornication and adultery. Allah commanded women neither to display their adornment nor to display any form of behaviour that might attract the attention of men.

    In fact, scholars from various schools of thought prohibit women from raising their voices in public, even if it be the utterance of the talbiyah during hajj or the adhan (call to prayer) between females. The Sharia also prohibits men to visit lonely women and to stay alone with them. It also prohibited men to look at women. One of the main problems is limiting the hijab as being a manifestation of female Muslim identity. When France banned the hijab they looked at it as a religious symbol unable to understand the meaning of ibaadah (worship). However, it is unfortunate to see many Muslims treating it as merely a form of identity, and once the symbolic representation has been accomplished the necessity to perform it in a way that meets its conditions laid down by Allah is overlooked. This is one of subtly reprehensible values that many western Muslims have unknowingly adopted. We have to understand that Islamic practices including observing the hijab are actions of ibaadah. They are meant to please Allah, avoid being disobedient, and earn hasanaat in order to attain a high rank in paradise.

    This is a major mistake that many Muslims fall into when undertaking many Islamic practices. Having the correct aim in wearing the hijab is the first and main step towards a solution for this problem. It should be noted that projecting concerns about this non-shar’ii form of hijab does not imply discouraging Muslim women from observing a limited form of hijab which they have chosen, but instead it serves to encourage Muslim women to progress to observe the correct method of hijab. The intention of this article is driven by the desire for improvement and progress and not to incite women to withdraw from the hijab completely.

    Some Muslims posit that we should not be strict in calling for the proper observance of many Islamic practices in the west, and as such, we should encourage Muslim women to do as much as they are, without criticism, even if some do not complete such observance. Undoubtedly we agree to encouraging Muslim women to do as much as they can, but correcting wrong or incomplete Islamic practices is an obligation upon those who know.

    It is indeed the case that many sisters are completely ignorant about the conditions of the legally valid hijab, and hence it is incumbent upon us to raise awareness of the legal conditions and features of a correct hijab. Knowledge is the cure for many of our mistakes. Advising sisters who undoubtedly wear the hijab out of good intentions as well as educating their parents is another way towards solving this issue. It might be a good idea to print and distribute some leaflets that describe the authentic hijab in a way that goes beyond merely a head covering.
    IA
    http://www.londonschoolofislamics.org.uk

  2. I reject the idea of “the united Hijab Day” This action is unproductive act, will create more problem in plural community mainly in the West.

    This act provoke Islamophobia and make them more atringer and more agressive toward all Muslim. They hate Wonen who wear hijab.

    Please stop provocating Islamophobia, it is not wise at all.
    Iskam is a religion of peace, NOT provocation.

    All ❤️
    Progressive Muslim make Islam great again.

    • My experience is that no one respects those who just ‘give in’ in order to pretend to be integrated. Give up hijab, start drinking wine, eat pork. Do you think ‘the locals’ will appreciate it or you? My experience is that most people respect you for sticking to your own rules. One boss told me that I respect that you became Muslim, ‘I also do not really believe in Christianity but do not have the courage to take your step’. Another, when we celebrated a new contract with Champagne made sure that his secretary provided me with pure grape juice. Long live the Hijab Day! Compliments to all the ladies who wear it!

      • My parent advice me.
        When you visit and stay with your friend house, follow his tradition or rule, do not provoke your lively friend. But if you cannot honor or respect his tradition donot live or stay in his house. This is the wise rule.

        Most Muslim and women who came as refugee to the West Countries do not respect their culture or tradition, on contrary want to provoke their culture or tradition publictly. It is un-Islam. It is behavior hatred toward christian culture. Be careful with agressive backlash from Islamophobia.

        This view from progressive Islam
        All❤️

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s