Talibani Atheism’ & how it fuels Islamophobia

Kashifmd.com: Bigotry of any sort – whether based on race, gender, religion or ethnic background – is like cancer. It must be condemned in its start before it metastasizes and takes root in society. At this point, it is usually too late to cure the disease, which rapidly progresses to its natural, malignant fallout. Islamophobia is one such strand of bigotry.

The term is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as an “intense dislike or fear of Islam; hostility or prejudice towards Muslims”. Multiple studies have shown that Islamophobia is on the rise in the West for the last few decades. This should be a cause of concern for all citizens of the civilized world.

Islam is not a monolithic faith. It has numerous sects and sub-sects that differ based on their understanding of the Quran. They also differ in their analysis and extent of reliance on recorded narrations – collected centuries later – of Prophet Muhammad, with one sect treating all such narrations as authentic, another disregarding them altogether and a whole spectrum in between. Given this diversity, the actions of a particular faction within Islam can only be representative of that group, not the whole religion. It is the teachings of the Quran and the proven example of Prophet Muhammad that define the Islamic faith as a whole.

Of the sects within Islam, I belong to the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community. This is one of the largest communities of Muslims worldwide, with tens of millions of members in over 200 countries in the world, all united under His Holiness, the Khalifa of Islam. We not just claim, we also demonstrate that Islam promotes universal justice, freedom of speech and free exchange and criticism of ideas. We promote peace through dialogue and support universal freedom of conscience for people of all faiths – and of no faith. We are at the forefront of humanitarian service throughout the world. We have schools to impart secular education, hospitals to treat the sick, and charity projects to provide food and water etc. across parts of the developing world. In the United States alone, we collected 30,000 bags of blood to commemorate 9/11 victims and recently took our fight against hunger to the US Congress. We condemn violent Jihad, and apostasy and blasphemy laws as un-Islamic and inhumane, and champion the separation of Church and State.

Taliban and Al Qaeda are examples of fringe outliers to the right of the sectarian spectrum. They are the Christian, Jewish and Atheist equivalent of KKK, Brit Hakanaim and the League of Militant Atheists respectively. Claiming that these terrorist groups represent their respective faiths or philosophy is not simplistic, it is outright stupid.

Here is where “Talibani atheists” – a term I coined over the weekend – come in.

Like Islam, atheism is no monolithic group of people either. Most of my atheist friends are great people, like most of my theist friends. Kile, the editor-in-chief of Claremont Journal of Religion, is one such example. He is keen on “interfaith” discourse and on building bridges between religious and atheist communities. He disagrees with religion but does not hate it. Most of my atheist friends are like Kile. Then, there are my New Atheist friends that are anti-religion. There is diversity within this group as well. There are those, like Faisal Saeed, who believe that religion – and hence scripture – must be subject to critique and countered with rational argument. A proponent of reason, I agree with his stated approach and use the same to counter extremist narratives.

And then, there are those like Hirsi Ali and Sam Harris, who – like their Talibani counterparts – are extreme outliers in this diverse group. So, why do I call them Talibani atheists? And what sets them apart from other atheists?

Talibani atheists are like the Taliban. They share the same neuronal biochemistry. Just as the Taliban are spiteful, the Talibani atheists are dutifully programmed to obsessively hate, ridicule and condemn religion in their daily routines. They believe that all Islam – including Ahmadiyya Islam – is evil, and they deny the existence of moderate Islam altogether. They argue that a good Muslim and a good human are mutually exclusive. If I am a good person, I must not be following Islam. If I follow Islam truly, I must be a bad person. The Taliban, similarly, stigmatize those they despise, based on mere affiliation. Like their counterparts, Talibani atheists are rigid in their worldview and childishly stubborn. Moreover, Talibani atheists rely on Talibani narrative for their understanding of Islam.

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