Why Some Muslim Women Don’t Wear Hijab

Credit: Jakarta Globe.

A cleric takes out two candies; unwraps one of them and throws them both onto the floor. He asks: “If you have to choose, which candy will you pick? Of course, you’ll take the wrapped one because it’s the clean one. In Islam, we protect our women through hijab.” A cleric takes out two candies; unwraps one of them and throws them both onto the floor. He asks: “If you have to choose, which candy will you pick? Of course, you’ll take the wrapped one because it’s the clean one. In Islam, we protect our women through hijab.”

First of all, I’m a believer: I’m a practicing Muslim. Second, I don’t wear hijab. And from here my story starts.

One day, a male friend tagged me on a note in Facebook; it’s about a conversation between a non-Muslim man and an Islamic cleric.

The man asks: “Why does Islam oblige Muslim women to wear hijab?”

In answering the question, the cleric takes out two candies; unwraps one of them and throws them both onto the floor. He asks: “If you have to choose, which candy will you pick?”

The man answers: “Of course I’ll take the wrapped one, because it’s the clean one.”

The cleric goes, “Indeed. In Islam, we protect our women through hijab.”

Feeling disturbed with that degrading analogy, I sent him a message.

“Do you suggest that non-hijabi Muslim women are dirty? And how come you compare women with candies?”

This guy replied, “Don’t take it to your heart. Just understand that wearing hijab is an obligation in Islam, and shouldn’t be compromised.”

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Categories: Asia, Indonesia

2 replies

  1. A very good article which is also thought provoking.

    How does Islam view a woman who is disabled, and if the disease she was suffering from got worse due to over-heating which wearing a burqa would do in a tropical climate? What if a person has hearing problems where covering the ears would block out a lot of sound? What if wearing a burqa is not practical and would encumber her limited movements, etc.?

    I’m making all these points from personal experience. Does this mean that such a person is going to hell because she does not cover and wears clothes that are practical for her?

    And I’ve also found that it makes not an iota of difference if a woman is covered up to her eyebrows to supposedly keep her safe. In fact, as long as she’s unaccompanied by a male, she’s very vulnerable, e.g. Pakistan! So, in this case, where is the man’s propriety and morals?

    I encountered some such species when I visited Pakistan and the only language they finally understood was a very hard SLAP!!!

  2. A foremost problem with the contemporary clergy is that they do not DIFFERENTIATE between a “Religious Commandment” and the “Cultural Strains”.

    The Islamic Teaching (Quranic Verdicts and the Prescriptions by the Holy Prophet of Islam – saw) synthesizes the idea of “manifestation of Modest & Graceful Attire and to elude the Revelation of the body Curvature”.

    Hijab – as we see today at the airports and in the malls – is a cultural strain developed in subordination to the Islamic Teachings for the dwellers of Arabian Peninsula.

    Tibetan, Chinese and Central Asian Muslim Women, in contrast adopted “different” attire, which was more suitable to their cultural and climatic conditions.

    In Southeastern Asia – the peasant Muslim women, working in the Pedy Fields, still adopted a completely different way of dresses – that was appropriate for their cultural and climatic forte.

    Who stops the clergy from looking back into the history of Islam in various regions and from studying the evolution of cultures within the heroic Islamic states of Russia, Spain, Turkey, Afghanistan, Kashmir, Bangal, Central and Southern India, Malaysia, Indonesia, Mongolia, China and Tibet, etc.

    Those women were still Muslims without the Hijab of Arabian Peninsula Culture !!!!

    Islam is a World-Wide Faith and a Religion for All Times and Regions – LET IT REMAIN A RELIGION and Please DO NOT BRAND, CONSTRICT and CONFINE it within the CULTURE OF ARABIA.

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