The AstraZeneca vaccine is shown to drastically cut transmission of the virus.

Source: New York Times

By Marc Santora and Rebecca Robbins

The vaccine developed by the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca not only protects people from serious illness and death but also substantially slows the transmission of the virus, according to a new study — a finding that underscores the importance of mass vaccination as a path out of the pandemic.

The study by researchers at the University of Oxford is the first to document evidence that any coronavirus vaccine can reduce transmission of the virus.

Researchers measured the impact on transmission by swabbing participants every week seeking to detect signs of the virus. If there is no virus present, even if someone is infected, it cannot be spread. And they found a 67 percent reduction in positive swabs among those vaccinated.

The results, detailed by Oxford and AstraZeneca researchers in a manuscript that has not been peer-reviewed, found that the vaccine could cut transmission by nearly two-thirds.

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Categories: Vaccine

1 reply

  1. LONDON — The U.K.’s decision to delay the second shot of the AstraZeneca-University of Oxford coronavirus vaccine has been found to be an effective strategy, according to a new study.

    Oxford researchers found that the Covid vaccine was 76% effective at preventing symptomatic infection for three months after a single dose, and in fact that the efficacy rate rose with a longer interval between the first and second doses.

    A delay in the second dose means more people can get their first vaccines sooner because it eases a tight supply.

    “Vaccine efficacy after a single standard dose of vaccine from day 22 to day 90 post vaccination was 76% … and modelled analysis indicated that protection did not wane during this initial 3 month period,” the study found. It was published on Tuesday as a preprint and is under review at The Lancet medical journal.

    The efficacy rate rose to 82.4% when there was at least a 12-week interval before the second dose. When the second dose was given less than six weeks after the first one, the efficacy rate was 54.9%.

    “These analyses show that higher vaccine efficacy is obtained with a longer interval between the first and second dose, and that a single dose of vaccine is highly efficacious in the first 90 days, providing further support for current policy,” the report said.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2021/02/03/delaying-second-astrazeneca-vaccine-dose-does-work-study-shows.html

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