Islamic law is adopted by British legal chiefs

Telegraph: Islamic law is to be effectively enshrined in the British legal system for the first time under guidelines for solicitors on drawing up “Sharia compliant” wills.

Under ground-breaking guidance, produced by The Law Society, High Street solicitors will be able to write Islamic wills that deny women an equal share of inheritances and exclude unbelievers altogether.

The documents, which would be recognised by Britain’s courts, will also prevent children born out of wedlock – and even those who have been adopted – from being counted as legitimate heirs.

Anyone married in a church, or in a civil ceremony, could be excluded from succession under Sharia principles, which recognise only Muslim weddings for inheritance purposes.

Nicholas Fluck, president of The Law Society, said the guidance would promote “good practice” in applying Islamic principles in the British legal system.

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Categories: Europe and Australia

1 reply

  1. Subject: Shariah

    Women were not allowed to inherit property before Islam. Many girls were killed shortly after being born (just like in India today). These are a couple of the improvements Islam bought to women. There are many more. Please don’t generalise from your ignorance. Shari’ah incorporates Islamic practice (prayers, fasting, pilgrimage, charity, shahadah), civil law, and criminal law. To what do you object? Prayer? Civil law (people are entitled to resolve their civil law differences by whatever means they like, in the UK)?

    Thousands of Muslims are turning to them to help resolve family, financial and commercial problems in accordance with Sharia principles. It is a Growing demand. An estimated 85 Sharia councils could be operating in Britain, according to a 2009 report by the think tank Civitas. Several bodies like the Islamic Sharia Council have seen a large increase in their cases in the past five years. ”Our cases have easily more than tripled over the past three to five years,” says Sheikh al-Haddad. ”On average, every month we can deal with anything from 200 to 300 cases. A few years ago it was just a small fraction of that. ”Muslims are becoming more aligned with their faith and more aware of what we are offering them,” he explained. But while a demand for Sharia continues in Britain, Sheikh Haitham al-Haddad says the practice cannot be banned. ”We are not forcing people to walk through our doors. They are voluntarily coming to us,” he said. ”If you ban us, then British Muslims will find somewhere else to go. ”Many will go to Muslim countries abroad, where there will be no way to protect them.

    The principles of Sharia govern all aspects of a Muslim’s life. It is derived from a combination of sources including the Koran, the Hadith, which is based on the example of the prophet Muhammad, and fatwas, which are rulings of Islamic scholars. As a demand for Sharia thrives, a number of British law firms are starting to tap into the booming market. Muslim Lawyer Aina Khan has launched one of the first Sharia departments at her London-based law firm. She offers clients advice that is in keeping with both English and Islamic law. ”I am surprised that the majority of people that I am dealing with are under the age of 50. They are British Muslims who want to satisfy their British identity as well as their Muslim one. ”So I give them solutions to their problems that satisfy both legal systems all under one place.” Sharia judges hear cases in which Muslims volunteer to accept their rulings.
    IA
    London School of Islamics Trust

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