Is Christianity dying; Seventy percent don’t believe in Eucharist?

vatican-city

The Vatican City. The Muslim Times has the best collection for rational and focused on interfaith tolerance understanding of Christianity. Suggested reading: Joel Osteen: Enlarging the Circle of Love

Just one-third of U.S. Catholics agree with their church that Eucharist is body, blood of Christ

Source: Pew Research Center

By Gregory A. Smith  is an associate director of research at Pew Research Center.

Transubstantiation – the idea that during Mass, the bread and wine used for Communion become the body and blood of Jesus Christ – is central to the Catholic faith. But a new Pew Research Center survey finds that most self-described Catholics don’t believe this core teaching. In fact, nearly seven-in-ten Catholics (69%) say they personally believe that during Catholic Mass, the bread and wine used in Communion “are symbols of the body and blood of Jesus Christ.”

FT_19.08.05_transubstantiationsymbolic640px

Just one-third of U.S. Catholics (31%) say they believe that “during Catholic Mass, the bread and wine actually become the body and blood of Jesus.”

In addition to asking Catholics what they believe about the Eucharist, the new survey also included a question that tested whether Catholics know what the church teaches on the subject. Most Catholics who believe that the bread and wine are symbolic do not know that the church holds that transubstantiation occurs. Overall, 43% of Catholics believe that the bread and wine are symbolic and also that this reflects the position of the church. Still, one-in-five Catholics (22%) reject the idea of transubstantiation, even though they know about the church’s teaching.

The vast majority of those who believe that the bread and wine actually become the body and blood of Christ – 28% of all Catholics – do know that this is what the church teaches. A small share of Catholics (3%) profess to believe in the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist despite not knowing the church’s teaching on transubstantiation.

About six-in-ten (63%) of the most observant Catholics — those who attend Mass at least once a week — accept the church’s teaching about transubstantiation. Still, even among this most observant group of Catholics, roughly one-third (37%) don’t believe that the Communion bread and wine actually become the body and blood of Christ (including 23% who don’t know the church’s teaching and 14% who know the church’s teaching but don’t believe it). And among Catholics who do not attend Mass weekly, large majorities say they believe the bread and wine are symbolic and do not actually become the body and blood of Jesus.

Read further

Suggested reading

Eucharist: Some say it is Wafer, Others believe it is Body of Jesus

A Nobel for Karen Armstrong will bring the Christians and the Muslims closer

Our Favorite Christian Prayer by Saint Francis, For the Whole of our Human Family

Love thy Neighbor is a Christian Value, Hate and Stereotyping aren’t

Santa Claus is Make-Belief for Children and Eucharist and Trinity, Make-Belief for Grown ups?

Joel Osteen: Enlarging the Circle of Love

The Best Collection to Introduce Islam to the Fellow Christians

3 replies

  1. This is so made up. They made up these numbers. It’s a farce. This is not true at all. Catholics do believe in the presence of God in the Eucharist they would not be Catholics if they did not believe. Stop making up lies.

  2. Ask Muslims, how many of them believe that God is present during their 5 daily prayers?
    The details of dogma and belief are not important. Religions do not die. They continue to serve their primary purpose which is to create a moral human being. All religions have this ability, Hinduism, Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism and Islam. None of them is dying.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.