Revolutionaries in the Middle East have learnt crucial lessons since the Arab Spring

The success of popular action and civil disobedience in Sudan and Algeria has been treated sceptically by commentators. The pessimists might just be getting it wrong this time round, just as the optimists did eight years ago

Dictators in Sudan and Algeria, who between them had held power for 50 years, were driven from office in the space of a single month in April

Dictators in Sudan and Algeria, who between them had held power for 50 years, were driven from office in the space of a single month in April ( AFP/Getty )

Two very different political waves are sweeping through the Middle East and north Africa. Popular protests are overthrowing the leaders of military regimes for the first time since the failed Arab Spring of 2011. At the same time, dictators are seeking to further monopolise power by killing, jailing or intimidating opponents who want personal and national liberty.

Dictators in Sudan and Algeria, who between them had held power for 50 years, were driven from office in the space of a single month in April, though the regimes they headed are still there. The ousting of Sudanese president Omar al-Bashir, now under arrest, came after 16 weeks of protests. Hundreds of thousands continue to demonstrate, chanting “civilian rule, civilian rule” and “we will remain in the street until power is handed over to civilian authority”.

The protesters are conscious of one of the “what not to do” lessons of 2011, when mass demonstrations in Egypt got rid of President Hosni Mubarak, only to see him replaced two years later by an even more authoritarian dictatorship led by General Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi. A referendum is to be held over three days from this Saturday on constitutional amendments that will enable el-Sisi to stay in power until 2030.

more:

https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/arab-spring-sudan-algeria-protests-dictators-uprisings-egypt-a8878236.html

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