A 40 story cross should symbolize peaceful co-existence and respectful discussion about Jesus

A Christian businessman is building a 140-foot cross in the middle of Pakistan’s largest city. The cross, expected to be completed this summer, is being billed as the “largest cross in Asia.” (Tim Craig/The Washington Post)

A Christian businessman is building a 140-foot cross in the middle of Pakistan’s largest city. The cross, expected to be completed this summer, is being billed as the “largest cross in Asia.” (Tim Craig/The Washington Post)

A ‘bulletproof’ cross rises in Karachi

Source: Washington Post
 May 15  

 Pakistani businessman Parvez Henry Gill says he was sleeping when God crashed into one of his dreams and gave him a job: find a way to protect Christians in Pakistan from violence and abuse. “I want you to do something different,” God told him.

That was four years ago, and Gill, a lifelong devout Christian, struggled for months with how to respond. Eventually, after more restless nights and more prayers, he awoke one morning with his answer: He would build one of the world’s largest crosses in one of the world’s most unlikely places.

“I said, ‘I am going to build a big cross, higher than any in the world, in a Muslim country,’ ” said Gill, 58. “It will be a symbol of God, and everybody who sees this will be worry-free.”

Now, in this overwhelmingly Muslim country, in the heart of a city where Islamist extremists control pockets of some neighborhoods, the 14-story cross is nearly complete.

It is being built at the entrance to Karachi’s largest Christian cemetery, towering over thousands of tombstones that are often vandalized. Once his cross looms over such acts of disrespect, Gill said, he hopes it can convince the members of Pakistan’s persecuted Christian minority that someday their lives will get better.

“I want Christian people to see it and decide to stay here,” said Gill, who started the project about a year ago.

The cross, in southern Karachi, is 140 feet tall — higher than most office buildings in downtown Washington — and includes a 42-foot crosspiece. It isn’t the world’s tallest; that distinction is claimed by the Great Cross in St. Augustine, Fla., which is about 208 feet tall, although the Millennium Cross in Macedonia is said to tower 217 feet above ground. Crosses approaching 200 feet also have been constructed in Illinois, Louisiana and Texas.

But Gill says his cross at the Gora Qabristan Cemetery, which dates to the British colonial era, will be the largest in Asia.

The structure certainly will stand out in Pakistan, where Muslims account for more than 90 percent of the population. Christians make up just 1.5 percent of Pakistan’s 180 million people, according to the country’s last census. Christian leaders, who accuse the government of a deliberate undercount, say a more accurate figure is about 5.5 percent.

Read further

Additional Reading

Breaking News: Jesus Did Not Die for Our Sins

65 Reasons to Believe Jesus Did Not Die on the Cross

Is Human Life Sacred: The Body and the Spirit

Every time I see a Cross, I am Reminded …

1 reply

  1. There are two issues here. One is the human rights issue for the Christians in Pakistan and in that respect we stand shoulder to shoulder with our Christian brethren and sisters, every where in the world.

    The other issue is of Christian theology and we do not believe that Jesus, may peace be on him, was on a suicidal mission and in that regards we link a few articles here:

    Breaking News: Jesus Did Not Die for Our Sins

    65 Reasons to Believe Jesus Did Not Die on the Cross

    Every time I see a Cross, I am Reminded …

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