Ahmadiyya Islam’s ‘jihad of the pen’ inspires peaceful approach to crisis

BY MOHYUDDIN MIRZA, EDMONTON JOURNAL MARCH 9, 2015

More than 1,000 people formed a “ring of peace” around the Norwegian capital’s synagogue, an initiative taken by young Muslims in Norway last month. Ahmadiyya Muslims advocate such a peaceful approach to conflict, says Offerings columnist Mohyuddin Mirza. Photograph by: Hakon Mosvold Larsen , AP, file

More than 1,000 people formed a “ring of peace” around the Norwegian capital’s synagogue, an initiative taken by young Muslims in Norway last month. Ahmadiyya Muslims advocate such a peaceful approach to conflict, says Offerings columnist Mohyuddin Mirza.
Photograph by: Hakon Mosvold Larsen , AP, file

Edmonton News: There is no dearth of commentaries, analyses, ideas and reports on the subject of extremism, terrorism, extremist Islam and radicalization of youths from western nations. A renewed urgency of handling or tackling this problem resulted after attacks on Canadian soil and more recently the massacre in Paris. The Islamic State (IS) is in the news on a daily basis and there is no end in sight for this ideology.

Why have we not been able to find solution to this malaise of terrorism, especially in the context of Islam? And how much can the religion of Islam be blamed for such acts of violence?

I have been a practising Muslim since my birth and I have never been taught to show violence of any kind. Actually it was my understanding of Islam that taught me to be patient, forbear, let go of small issues and practise kindness at every level. In my first, understandable introduction to the Qur’an as a seven-year-old, I learned that “there is no compulsion in matter of faith.”

Some people point to passages from the Qur’an that appear to incite violence. Such passages exist in all religious texts, and must be taken in proper context. For example, in Islam, when permission was given to wage jihad, it was to defend the freedom of worship and conscience.

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