Immigrant Students Graduate with Honors

Zujaja Tauqeer, An Ahmadi Muslim Student and CUNY’s fifth Rhodes Scholar

Hailing from countries as varied as Togo and Sri Lanka, Poland and the Dominican Republic, immigrant students made their mark among The City University of New York’s Class of 2011, winning competitive academic honors and heading for some of the finest graduate programs in the world.

High-achieving immigrants graduating from CUNY’s two-year and four-year colleges are plunging into fields spanning medicine and scientific research, forensics, teaching and law at prestigious institutions including Harvard Medical School and Stanford Law.

This year’s graduates reflect the University’s historic and continuing commitment to providing access, opportunity and support to immigrants and their children. Students whose native language is not English comprise some 47 percent of CUNY students, while 37 percent of first-time freshmen are born outside the U.S. mainland.

“For New York’s immigrant students, CUNY is the golden door to a wealth of academic opportunity,” said Chancellor Matthew Goldstein. “We are proud that these graduates chose to pursue their educations – and their futures – here and we know that they are part of this University’s continued success.”

CUNY’s fifth Rhodes Scholar, Zujaja Tauqeer, who is enrolled in the combined Brooklyn College-SUNY Downstate College of Medicine B.A.-M.D. program, will attend Oxford University in England this fall for an M. Phil. in the history of medicine.

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1 reply

  1. It is nice to hear:

    “CUNY’s fifth Rhodes Scholar, Zujaja Tauqeer, who is enrolled in the combined Brooklyn College-SUNY Downstate College of Medicine B.A.-M.D. program, will attend Oxford University in England this fall for an M. Phil. in the history of medicine.”

    One of our Editors, Abdul Haq Compier, has studied the history of medicine extensively. I would request him to cover this subject on his page about Muslim Heritage, suggesting the best books and internet sources, covering the history during the 7th to 16th century, the so called dark ages.

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