EXCLUSIVE: Anthony Mundine claims Aboriginal Australians are MUSLIM and share identical beliefs – as boxer admits he turned to Islam because Christianity was too confusing for him

  • Anthony Mundine says traditional Aboriginal beliefs are identical to Islam
  • The former rugby league star claims Indigenous people are all Muslim 
  • He makes the shock claims in a video interview with Islamic Museum of Australia
  • He says he converted to Islam because he found Christianity too confusing 

By KEVIN AIRS FOR DAILY MAIL AUSTRALIA

PUBLISHED: 15:37 GMT, 8 November 2022 | UPDATED: 15:37 GMT, 8 November 2022

Anthony Mundine has claimed Australia’s Aboriginal people are Muslim, with almost identical belief systems between Islam and the indigenous Dreamtime.

The former rugby league star-turned-boxer switched faiths in 1999 and has since converted troubled league stars Sonny Bill Williams and Blake Ferguson to Islam.

Now in a new video interview with the Islamic Museum of Australia, the Aboriginal activist has explained what drew him to the core principles of Islam.

Anthony Mundine explains why converted to Islam after Christianity

Fullscreenhttps://videos.dailymail.co.uk/preview/mol/2022/11/08/4474662849875496296/636x382_MP4_4474662849875496296.mp4

Anthony Mundine has claimed Australia's Aboriginal people are Muslim, with almost identical belief systems between the religion and the ancient indigenous Dreamtime

Anthony Mundine has claimed Australia’s Aboriginal people are Muslim, with almost identical belief systems between the religion and the ancient indigenous Dreamtime

He has previously branded Australia one of the most racist countries in the world, and said homosexuality was against Aboriginal Dreamtime beliefs. 

‘Our traditional law is pretty much identical to Islam,’ the father of four told interviewer Mustafa Fahour. 

‘There’s roles for women and men, what you can and can’t do, social system, justice system…

‘Pretty much all also those are sort of the same. And I found in Aboriginal lore, the belief was in the one God, the oneness of God, the One God.

‘To me, we are Muslim. Our people are Muslim.’

He added: ‘People don’t realise that all a Muslim is, is somebody who submits their will to the one creator, the one lord – our people did that for years.’

In a new video interview with the Islamic Museum of Australia, the Aboriginal activist (pictured at prayer above) has compared traditional Indigenous beliefs to the core principles of Islam

In a new video interview with the Islamic Museum of Australia, the Aboriginal activist (pictured at prayer above) has compared traditional Indigenous beliefs to the core principles of Islam

He said he abandoned his Church of England roots to turn to Islam because of the Anglican links to colonisation, and because he found Christianity too complex to understand.

‘The country was colonised and Christianity was forced upon our people,’ he said. ‘I wanted to really delve in and see what what their core belief is. 

‘They’re believing in the Father, Son, Holy Spirit, whatnot. Three sort of separate, identities being, not three, but one. 

‘And just really, it was confusing for me.’

He said he had never smoked, drunk alcohol or taken drugs in his life, which made the switch from Christianity to Islam an easy one for him.

‘That just came together like a glove,’ he said. ‘I was missing feeding that soul within me and when I got that [from Islam] it was a wrap.’ 

The former Dragons legend-turned-boxer switched faiths in 1999 and has since converted troubled league stars Kiwi Sonny Bill Williams (pictured right with Mundine) and Blake Ferguson to Islam

The former Dragons legend-turned-boxer switched faiths in 1999 and has since converted troubled league stars Kiwi Sonny Bill Williams (pictured right with Mundine) and Blake Ferguson to Islam

The controversial star was slammed in 2001 for his comments in the wake of the 9/11 attack on the Twin Towers when he said: ‘They call it an act of terrorism, but if you can understand religion, and our way of life, it’s not about terrorism. 

‘It’s about fighting for God’s law, and America’s brought it upon themselves.’

He also took a swipe at fellow Aboriginal sports star Cathy Freeman in 2007, and branded her a sell-out.

‘Cathy Freeman. She sold out, toeing the line,’ he said at the time. ‘And that ain’t me. I’m not a fake.’

Now he insists he wants to fight racism and oppression and hopes to be inspired by Malcolm X to make an even greater impact on society.

‘I’ve always been, not a fan, but a supporter of Malcolm X,’ he said. 

‘Because of what he stood for – his morals and of injustice and oppression on his people – that’s what I wanted to do down here with my profile, my success.

‘I want to try to empower and call out the BS, call out the racism, call out the oppression and whatnot. 

‘It’s giving me this resilience that it doesn’t matter what they say about me, doesn’t matter what they do do to me, it’s like water off a duck’s back. It doesn’t bother me. 

‘Nothing fazes me in that sense. When people get on social media and they troll people – I don’t care what they say, what they write good.

‘As long as I say my piece, I’m good. That’s probably why I accomplished everything I have because of the backlash and hate.’

Father of four Anthony Mundine (pictured with wife Danielle) said he abandoned his Church of England roots to turn to Islam because of the Anglican links to colonisation, and because he said he found Christianity too complex to understand

Father of four Anthony Mundine (pictured with wife Danielle) said he abandoned his Church of England roots to turn to Islam because of the Anglican links to colonisation, and because he said he found Christianity too complex to understand

Mundine also echoed the words of another 1960s icon when he talked about his switch from rugby league to boxing and used the words rom a famous Martin Luther King speech.

‘From a young age, I had a dream,’ he said. ‘I had passion for rugby league at the time, I wanted to be the best I could be at that. 

But I knew one day – because of my dad and my dad’s bloodlines, and his history and success in boxing – I knew I wanted to do boxing one day.

‘I never had the pedigree or anything like that, but I just knew I had it in my blood. And I thought I was talented, I could fight. 

‘I had it in my head that I was destined to to succeed and do whatever I wanted to do as far as what I loved. 

‘The main thing is making the right choices.’

source https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/boxing/article-11401745/Anthony-Mundine-claims-Indigenous-Australians-Muslim.html

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