Turkish leader’s sultan-like love for megaprojects to be tested

Ankara: From soaring bridges to a giant mosque to plans for the world’s biggest airport, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has used gargantuan building projects as an engine of growth and a signature way of leaving an indelible stamp on his nation.

As he campaigns for re-election on Sunday, Erdogan has promised his most ambitious project yet: a canal that would bisect the country and create a Turkish-owned trade route, which he says would make Turkey a great power and leave a legacy for the history books.

Backdropped by the Bosporus Strait separating Asia and Europe, a man strolls past an election poster of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, in Istanbul.
Backdropped by the Bosporus Strait separating Asia and Europe, a man strolls past an election poster of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, in Istanbul.

Photo: AP

“What makes Panama is the Panama Canal,” Erdogan told supporters at a rally in Istanbul last weekend. “Suez is the biggest source of revenue for Egypt. Let’s have a vote. God willing, the Istanbul Canal will be another fresh breath for our city.”

The election is shaping up as an up-or-down vote on how Erdogan has transformed Turkey during 15 years in charge. He has amassed sultan-like powers, jailed political enemies and trimmed civil liberties, even as average annual economic growth of 5 per cent has spawned and nurtured a middle class.

But the most obvious way Erdogan has left his mark stands before the eyes of any visitor: grandiose monuments and infrastructure investments in just about every town.

There are signs that the public is weary of Erdogan’s building mania. The canal is the latest dividing line between those who see Erdogan’s projects as visionary, and those who say the works are guided by an insatiable construction industry that has enriched his ruling circle, raising questions about his management of a faltering economy.

Erdogan called the election a year and a half ahead of schedule, hoping to beat the economic downturn nipping at his heels. A once-fractured opposition has united against him, making it increasingly uncertain whether he will meet the 50 per cent threshold to win outright and avoid a runoff against his top challenger.

Thousands of supporters of Muharrem Ince, the presidential candidate of Turkey's main opposition Republican People's Party, attend a rally in Izmir.
Thousands of supporters of Muharrem Ince, the presidential candidate of Turkey’s main opposition Republican People’s Party, attend a rally in Izmir.

Photo: AP

Erdogan counts his building feats at virtually every election rally and warns that his opponents plan to tear down everything his Justice and Development Party, or AKP, has built. The party “built 284,000 classrooms,” he declared recently in the town of Mugla, adding “Are you going to demolish them too?”

He lists his big canal project in first place on his campaign posters. Not one shovel has been put in the ground, but Erdogan has vowed to begin construction immediately if he is re-elected as president and assumes sweeping new powers.

more:

https://www.smh.com.au/world/middle-east/turkish-leader-s-sultan-like-love-for-megaprojects-to-be-tested-20180622-p4zn3q.html

Categories: Asia, Europe, Turkey, Turks

Tagged as: ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.