A Message Of Support For Muslims After Paris Attacks Is Lighting Up The Internet

NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 13:  One World Trade Center's spire is shown lit in French flags colors of  white, blue and red in solidarity with France after tonight's terror attacks in Paris, November 13, 2015 in New York City. According to reports, over 150 people were killed in a series of bombings and shootings across Paris, including at a soccer game at the Stade de France and a concert at the Bataclan theater.  (Photo by Daniel Pierce Wright/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – NOVEMBER 13: One World Trade Center’s spire is shown lit in French flags colors of white, blue and red in solidarity with France after tonight’s terror attacks in Paris, November 13, 2015 in New York City. According to reports, over 150 people were killed in a series of bombings and shootings across Paris, including at a soccer game at the Stade de France and a concert at the Bataclan theater. (Photo by Daniel Pierce Wright/Getty Images)

Source: Huffington Post

When Alex Malloy caught a cab in Manhattan just after 11 p.m. on Friday, he did not expect anything out of the ordinary.

After he stepped inside, the driver immediately said, “Thank you.” Malloy, 23, told The Huffington Post he wasn’t sure what to make of it at the time, but would later write that the conversation that followed was “one of the most heartbreaking moments I’ve ever experienced in my whole life.”

The driver, roughly the same age as Malloy, explained that he was thanking him for being his first customer in two hours. The man suspected it was because people were suspicious of his Muslim faith in the wake of the Paris attacks.

Malloy empathized with the driver and expressed his support over the course of the 25-minute ride from Columbus Circle to Washington Heights. Malloy was so moved, he told HuffPost, he forgot to ask for the driver’s name.

The exchange inspired Malloy to share his experience on Twitter and Facebook immediately afterward. The passionate message against Islamophobia went viral overnight.

“He cried the whole way to my apartment and it made me cry, too,” Malloy wrote. “He kept saying, ‘Allah, my God, does not believe in this! People think I’m a part of this and I’m not. Nobody wants to drive with me because they feel unsafe. I can’t even do my job.’”

Malloy took the opportunity to speak out against those who use the actions of extremists to generalize about Muslims.

“Please stop saying ‘Muslims’ are the problem because they are not and they are feeling more victimized and scared to the day,” Malloy wrote. “These are our brothers and sisters as humankind, we are all humans underneath this skin. And they deserve nothing more than our respect and attention. They need our protection. Please stop viewing these beautiful human beings as enemies because they are not.”

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