We do not establish schools for the purpose of indoctrination – Ahmadiyya Muslim Mission

Alhaji Maulvi Noor Mohammed Bin Salih, the Ameer and Missionary in charge of the Ahmadiyya Mission

Alhaji Maulvi Noor Mohammed Bin Salih, the Ameer and Missionary in charge of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Mission, Ghana says the establishment of schools by the Mission was not for indoctrination purposes.

Rather, he said, the schools were established by the Ahmadiyya community to serve humanity for which their schools were anchored on the principles of discipline, morality, and nobility in character.

Maulvi Bin Salih made these remarks at the climax of the golden jubilee anniversary celebration of the Potsin T.I Ahmadiyya Senior High School (SHS) at the weekend.

The anniversary, which was on the theme “50 years of Educational Excellence: Potsin T.I. Ahmadiyya in retrospective,” brought together government officials including parliamentarians and ministers of state, old students, parents, and the public.

Maulvi Bin Salih noted that education was necessary and important for the development of every nation and reiterated the commitment and dedication of the Ahmadiyya Mission to continue with the provision of quality education in the country.

He explained that only about two to three per cent of the student population in T.I. Ahmadiyya schools were Ahmadis, indicating that those who had been the most beneficiaries of Ahmadiyya schools were non-Ahmadis.

“We do not establish schools for the purpose of indoctrination. Our interest is in the vulnerable. Education is necessary and important for every nation to develop,” he stated.

Commenting on the P. AMASS story, Ameer noted that through sustained dedicated efforts, the school had chalked numerous successes, produced high-ranking citizens and by dint of its achievement, grown to become a preferred learning centre for students throughout the country.

He also recognised the contributions of the founding fathers of the school who sacrificed their time, energy, and money to bring the school this far.

Mrs Samira Bawumia, the wife of Vice President Mahamudu Bawumia, praised the invaluable contributions of the Ahmadiyya Mission in the provision of education in the country and as well lauded the recent involvement of old students in the development of their schools.

She underscored the importance of implementing the free senior high school policy to produce the high-quality human resources needed to undertake the desired development of the country.

The Second Lady advised the students of the school to challenge themselves constantly and consistently, believe in themselves and work hard to achieve academic excellence and become successful in life.

In her report, the Headmistress, Hajia Zainab Adams expressed worry that in its 50 years of existence, the school had no assembly hall which had compelled authorities to improvise the dining hall for all social gatherings.

She mentioned other challenges include inadequate staff accommodation, absence of a library, lack of a vehicle for administrative purposes and lack of a befitting science laboratory.

She expressed gratitude to the government, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Mission for the foresight in establishing the school and the continuous unflinching support, the P.T.A and the old students for infrastructural development and financial support.

Awards and citations were given to founding fathers, past principals, distinguished past students and those who had immensely contributed to the development of the school, teaching and non-teaching staff and students who excelled in their academic work.

The Potsin T.I. Ahmadiyya Senior High School was established by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Mission under its Nuzrat-Jahan (Service to humanity) scheme with a student population of thirteen boys and a girl and four teachers including the headmaster in 1972.

source https://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/NewsArchive/We-do-not-establish-schools-for-the-purpose-of-indoctrination-Ahmadiyya-Muslim-Mission-1634657

2 replies

  1. When the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community reached to Western Africa 100 years ago they found that Christian Missionary Schools were discriminating, forcing students to become Christian if they wanted to be enrolled. That is why they were encouraged to open schools that will be / and are open to all.

    (Told to me by Alhaji Hassan Josef Al Atta from Ghana, who told me that his father gave him the name of Josef so that he could attend the only school nearby, a Christian Missionary School).

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