Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to scientists who discovered CRISPR gene editing tool for ‘rewriting the code of life’

Epigraph:

Every human life is precious and sacred and saving one is like the saving of the whole of humanity. (Al Quran 5:32/33)

The American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna (l) and the French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier, then winners of the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize 2016, are together in the casino of Goethe University. The two scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2020. Photo: picture alliance / dpa (Photo by Alexander Heinl/picture alliance via Getty Images)

(CNN) The Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna for the development of a method for genome editing. They discovered one of gene technology’s sharpest tools: the CRISPR/Cas9 genetic scissors. Using these, researchers can change the DNA of animals, plants and micro-organisms with extremely high precision. Göran K. Hansson, secretary-general for the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, said this year’s prize was about “rewriting the code of life.”

The CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing tools have revolutionized the molecular life sciences, brought new opportunities for plant breeding, are contributing to innovative cancer therapies and may make the dream of curing inherited diseases come true. Charpentier, from France, and Doudna, from the US, are the first women to jointly win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and the sixth and seventh women to win the chemistry prize.

Reference

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Categories: Biology, Genetics, Health

1 reply

  1. Two scientists have been awarded the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing the tools to edit DNA.

    Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna are the first two women to share the prize, awarded for their work on the technology of genome editing.

    Their discovery, known as Crispr-Cas9 genetic scissors, is a way of making specific and precise changes to the DNA contained in living cells.

    They will share the prize money of 10 million krona (£861,200; $1,110,400).

    The technology has been transformative for basic science research and it could also potentially be used to treat, or even cure, inherited illnesses.

    Commenting on her win, Prof Emmanuelle Charpentier, from the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens in Berlin, said she was emotional on learning about the award.

    “When it happens, you’re very surprised, and you think it’s not real. But obviously it’s real,” she said.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-54432589

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