Australia: Planting trees a statement for the future for the Beverley-based Ahmadiyya Muslim Community

Source: http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/messenger/west-beaches/planting-trees-a-statement-for-the-future-for-the-beverleybased-ahmadiyya-muslim-community/news-story/468e4aa8fa0cf66f2b4880b6db4aaf5d | Michelle Etheridge, michelle.etheridge@news.com.au, CoastCity Messenger


Zeeshan, 7, Haris, 14 months, Rakhshanda Kokab, Saleem Shaukat and Shayan, 4, were involved in a community planting at Oaklands Wetland and Reserve for National Tree Day on Sunday, through the Ahmadiyya Muslim Association. Picture: AAP/Keryn Stevens

SALEEM Shaukat hopes his work planting hundreds of trees will help locals realise Muslims want to “stand shoulder to shoulder” with other Australians.

The Woodcroft man was among about 60 members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community to plant shrubs and trees at Oaklands Wetland and Reserve on Sunday.

He has been taking part in National Tree Day for about 10 years, and says the project helps clear up misconceptions about Muslims.

“No matter what happens, we’re working together – no matter what religion we’re in, we’re all the same,” Mr Shaukat said.

“We’re happy to stand shoulder to shoulder with the Australian people and show them that we have love for all and hatred for none.”

Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, based at a mosque in Beverley, had about 100 Adelaide members take part in Adelaide planting events at the weekend.

They also planted trees and shrubs at Seacliff Park and Aberfoyle Park.

Khizar Rana, the group’s external affairs secretary, said members wanted to “give back to a country that has given us so much”.

“It’s a good way to have fun and help the environment and do something good for Australia at the same time,” he said. “Planting trees is given special significance in Islam. The many generations that are yet to come will benefit from the trees we are planting today and the entire earth will benefit in the future.”

At the Oaklands Park wetlands, the group planted a range of plants, including river red gums, drooping sheoaks, and twiggy daisies.

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