Muslim county in China bans children from religious events over break

 

 Reuters International

By Christian Shepherd

BEIJING (Reuters) – A mostly Muslim county in western China has banned children from attending religious events over a winter break, an education bureau said in a notice posted online, as authorities step up control of religious education.

School students in Linxia county in Gansu province, home to many members of the Muslim Hui ethnic minority, are prohibited from entering religious buildings over their break, a district education bureau said, according to the notification.

Students must also not read scriptures in classes or in religious buildings, the bureau said, adding that all students and teachers should heed the notice and work to strengthen political ideology and propaganda.

Reuters was unable to independently verify the authenticity of the notice.

A man who answered the telephone at the Linxia education bureau hung up when Reuters asked about the notice. A woman at the district education bureau declined to comment on the document’s authenticity.

Xi Wuyi, a Marxist scholar at the state-backed Chinese Academy of Social Scientists and an outspoken critic of rising Islamic influence in China, shared the picture and welcomed the apparent move by the authorities.

With the notice, the county was taking concrete action to keep religion and education separate and sticking strictly to education law, she said on the Weibo social media platform.

New regulations on religious affairs released in October last year, and due to take effect in February, aim to increase oversight of religious education, and provide for greater regulation of religious activities.

Last summer, a Sunday School ban was introduced in the southeastern city of Wenzhou, sometimes known as “China’s Jerusalem” due to its large Christian population, but Christian parents found ways to teach their children about their religion regardless.

Chinese law officially grants religious freedom for all but regulations on education and protection of minors also say religion cannot be used to hinder state education or to “coerce” children to believe.

Authorities in troubled parts of China, such as the far western region of Xinjiang, home to the Turkic-speaking Uighur Muslim minority, ban children from attending religious events.

But religious communities elsewhere rarely face blanket restrictions.

Fear of Muslims influence has grown in China in recent years, sparked in part by violence in Xinjiang.

The Chinese-speaking Hui, who are culturally more similar to the Han Chinese majority than to Uighurs, have also come under scrutiny from some intellectuals who fear creeping Islamic influence on society.

(Reporting by Christian Shepherd)

source:  https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/muslim-county-in-china-bans-children-from-religious-events-over-break/43829404

Categories: Asia, China

Tagged as: , , ,

7 replies

  1. It’s like a prison not country, a country provides freedom and privilege. Banning the basic right of choice of religion is imprisonment .

    • My respond is opposite with you guys.
      We cannot blame China 100 percent, we should blame Saudi Arabia and Iran ( Extremist Muslim) first. Why?

      Is there freedom of religion, and speech in Saudi where Islam was born. We never blame Saudi what they are doing for centuries as if we support or agree with it.

      I urge the educated Muslim, let us clean our house first and then we demand others do the same.
      Speak up loudly and demand Saudi and Iran to obey Human Right.
      ❤️

  2. As a developed country ,China needs to be open and respectful to all religions. China don’t need to follow the wrong examples of other countries. I hope and pray that they re-considers their decision.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: