A walk in the footsteps of Guru Nanak, before he was born

Scroll.In: So about six years after their wedding, the couple was blessed with a beautiful daughter. When it came to naming the child, it was suggested by Tripta’s mother that since the child was born in her maternal house, Nanaka in Punjabi, she should be called Nanaki. Thus, Tripta’s and Mehta Kalu’s first child came to be called Nanaki.


A gentle breeze blew against the plain, auguring a howling silence. The city was far from here, silent in the distance. Here on the mound, sitting under an acacia tree was an old man lost in his thoughts. On the other side of the mound there were construction cranes slowly digging into the ancient mound, not to unearth its archaeological secrets but to flatten the mound to make way for a new suburban locality.

“That is why the mound has diminished in size,” said Iqbal Qaiser. “I came here a few years ago. The mound was spread over this entire region,” he said, indicating with his arm the network of roads that had been laid for this new township, called Rehman Gardenia Society.

We climbed the final portion of the mound; a set of staircases, the only one there, to get to the top of the mound, where the shrine was located. Here, a man who must have been in his late sixties, sat on a mat laid out on the floor, showing a group of pilgrims who stood before him the sacred rocks. We waited for our turn.

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