New York Times: Malaria Drug Helps Virus Patients Improve, in Small Study

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Every human life is precious and sacred and saving one is like saving the whole of humanity. (Al Quran 5:32/33)

NY Times

The study, which has not yet undergone peer review, was small and limited to patients who were mildly or moderately ill, not severe cases.  Suggested reading by the Muslim Times: NY Doctor Claims 100% Success for His Cocktail for Coronavirus

By Denise Grady, who has been a science reporter for The Times since 1998. She wrote “Deadly Invaders,” a book about emerging viruses. @nytDeniseGrady

The malaria drug hydroxychloroquine helped to speed the recovery of a small number of patients who were mildly ill from the coronavirus, doctors in China reported this week.

Cough, fever and pneumonia went away faster, and the disease seemed less likely to turn severe in people who received hydroxychloroquine than in a comparison group not given the drug. The authors of the report said that the medication was promising, but that more research was needed to clarify how it might work in treating coronavirus disease and to determine the best way to use it.

“It’s going to send a ripple of excitement out through the treating community,” said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University.

The study was small and limited to patients who were mildly or moderately ill, not severe cases. Like many reports about the coronavirus, it was posted at medRxiv, an online server for medical articles, before undergoing peer review by other researchers.

But the findings strongly support earlier studies suggesting a role for the drug, Dr. Schaffner said.“I think it will reinforce the inclination of many people across the country who are not in a position to enter their patients into clinical trials but have already begun using hydroxychloroquine,” he said.

Previous reports from China and France that the drug seemed to help patients, along with enthusiastic comments from President Trump, have created a buzz around hydroxychloroquine and the closely related chloroquine, which are decades-old drugs used to treat malaria and autoimmune diseases like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. A resulting spike in demand has led to hoarding and shortages, and left patients who rely on the drugs for chronic diseases wondering whether they will be able to fill their prescriptions.

With no proven treatment for the coronavirus, many hospitals have simply been giving hydroxychloroquine to patients, reasoning that it might help and probably will not hurt, because it is relatively safe.

The earlier reports from France and China drew criticism because they did not include control groups to compare treated versus untreated patients. Researchers called the reports anecdotal, and said the lack of controls made it impossible to determine whether the drugs worked.

Among health officials who declined to endorse the drugs, and who called for clinical trials, were some members of the president’s coronavirus task force — including Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and Dr. Stephen Hahn, commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration.

The new study, of 62 patients with an average age of about 45, did have a control group. It was conducted at the Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, in Wuhan, China. The patients were carefully chosen to exclude people with medical problems that could be made worse by hydroxychloroquine, like abnormal heart rhythms, certain eye diseases, and liver or kidney problems.

Half the subjects — the controls — received just the usual care given to coronavirus patients, and half had usual care plus hydroxychloroquine. The usual care included oxygen, antiviral drugs, antibiotics and other treatments.

Their disease was considered mild, even though all had pneumonia that showed up on CT scans. After giving informed consent, they were assigned at random to either the hydroxychloroquine or the control group. They were treated for five days, and their fevers and coughing were monitored. They also had chest CT scans the day before the study treatment began, and the day after it ended.

Coughing and fever eased a day or so earlier in the patients who received hydroxychloroquine, and pneumonia improved in 25 of 31, as opposed to 17 of 31 in the controls.

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“We project that roughly 56 percent of our population – 25.5 million people – will be infected with the virus over an eight week period,” Governor Newsom of California wrote on 3/19/2020.

Categories: Health, The Muslim Times

1 reply

  1. A drug that could help treat coronavirus is to be trialled on a small number of patients in England and Scotland.

    The studies, which have been fast-tracked by the government, will initially involve 15 NHS centres.

    In the absence of a known treatment for the virus, a handful of experimental drugs are being tested globally.

    The drug, known as remdesivir, is manufactured by the pharmaceutical company Gilead.

    Two studies are to be carried out in the UK – one on patients with moderate symptoms, and one on those who are in a serious condition.

    Trials are already underway in China and the US, with the first results expected in the coming weeks.

    The UK trials will be based in England and Scotland and overseen by Dr Andrew Ustianowski, a consultant in infectious diseases.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/health-52111674

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