History Channel Video: Bible Secrets Revealed – Lost in Translation

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Watch the documentary in the History channel website. The Muslim Times has the best collection of articles about Christianity

Source: History channel

The Bible is one of the most influential and important books ever written and is considered by millions around the world to be the actual word of God. But has the Bible been translated, edited and even censored so many times throughout history that its original stories have been compromised? This episode explores many eye-opening contradictions and questions from a variety of historical and theological perspectives that have been debated for centuries. Is it possible that Moses did not actually write the first five books of the Old Testament? Could it be that David may not have been the real killer of Goliath? Were the four gospels of the New Testament attributed to Matthew, Mark, Luke and John actually written by completely different authors? With the discovery of the ancient Dead Sea Scrolls, and with recent archaeological findings about the New Testament, religious scholars have found evidence of many truly compelling Bible secrets.

Aired on:Nov 13, 2013

Available Until:Nov 12, 2023

Duration:44m 18s

The Muslim Times’ Chief Editor’s comments

Very interesting to learn from this video that the Catholic Church and then the Church of England wanted to monopolize the Bible to their ends. Today we find some of the so called Muslim scholars and clerics trying to monopolize the message of the holy Quran for their ends and disallow understanding, translation or commentary by the common people.

The video talks about William Tyndale, who (1494–1536) was an English scholar who became a leading figure in Protestant reform in the years leading up to his execution. He is well known for his translation of the Bible into English. He was influenced by the work of Desiderius Erasmus, who made the Greek New Testament available in Europe, and by Martin Luther.[2]

In 1535, Tyndale was arrested and jailed in the castle of Vilvoorde (Filford) outside Brussels for over a year. In 1536, he was convicted of heresy and executed by strangulation, after which his body was burnt at the stake. His dying prayer was that the King of England’s eyes would be opened; this seemed to find its fulfilment just two years later with Henry’s authorisation of the Great Bible for the Church of England, which was largely Tyndale’s own work. Hence, the Tyndale Bible, as it was known, continued to play a key role in spreading Reformation ideas across the English-speaking world and, eventually, to the British Empire.

The video also talks about John Wycliffe (/ˈwɪklɪf/; also spelled Wyclif, Wycliff, Wiclef, Wicliffe, Wickliffe; c. mid-1320s – 31 December 1384)[1] was an English scholastic philosopher, theologian, Biblical translator, reformer, and seminary professor at Oxford. He was an influential dissident within the Roman Catholic priesthood during the 14th century.

The Council of Constance declared Wycliffe a heretic on 4 May 1415, and banned his writings, effectively both excommunicating him retroactively and making him an early forerunner of Protestantism. The Council decreed that Wycliffe’s works should be burned and his remains removed from consecrated ground. This order, confirmed by Pope Martin V, was carried out in 1428.[22] Wycliffe’s corpse was exhumed and burned and the ashes cast into the River Swift, which flows through Lutterworth.

Suggested Reading

The Holy Quran Does Not Exhaust Any Subject in Any One Chapter

Cataloging 750 verses of the Holy Quran inspiring believers to study nature

The Holy Quran as the Miracle of the Holy Prophet

An Everlasting Miracle of the Holy Quran

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